Socrates Identity Analysis

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Identity in Socrates In The Trials & Death of Socrates aspects of identity and social environment are addressed clearly. It seems as though community and others come before self. Socrates was a very intelligent man who was ahead of his time. Although his arguments would seem persuasive to a reader, they would not change anyone's minds during his time. Socrates was brought in front of jury by a man named Meletus. This man accused Socrates of two violations of Athenian law, creating new gods not recognized by Athenians and corrupting the youth. In The Apology, which was actually not an apology at all, Socrates makes good arguments, but it wasn't about that; it was about the community's belief. Because he is teaching about and creating…show more content…
The first was that he was teaching new gods not recognized by the Athenians. The second was that he was corrupting the youth with his ideas and beliefs. He had arguments to defend himself but it wouldn't do much because he was one individual going against the community. The three aspects of identity and the social environment are addressed many times in this novel. Socrates was one man being accused by another man, Meletus, and was going to be judged by the jury, or the community. Socrates would be the "self" and the community is the people of Athens, represented by the jurors, Meletus, Anytus, etc.. Defining who the "others" are is somewhat difficult because, the others could be anyone. Once you define the community and Socrates himself, you're only left with one group of people, the Gods. Although the Gods were never physically in the story, they are what the story revolves around, so they can be considered the others. In this story, the community believes in the others. Socrates was the individual who had his own beliefs which is once again, why he was put on…show more content…
Although this portion of the book was called the Apology it was in no way apologetic. From the way he was acting it seemed as though he knew he wasn't going to win and that he was just defending himself to prove a point to his students and to the community. He was shown no mercy. He was found guilty, 280 voted against him and 221 voted for him. Following this he was given the option to come up with a suitable punishment for himself. Socrates was very determined and would not give up his beliefs just to the community's satisfaction. Even when it came to choosing an alternative punishment, Socrates was sort of mocking everyone by suggesting that he should be rewarded for his service to his state. Of course the community did not agree; he was given the death penalty. He was given many other chances to avoid the death penalty but he did not take advantage of them. He was told that he would not be acquitted if he would stop practicing philosophy, but he flatly
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