Sociological Perspective for Health and Social

679 Words3 Pages
Sociological perspective for health and social Functionalist The functionalist perspective, which is also called functionalism, is one of the main theoretical perspectives in sociology. The government, or the state, provides education for the children of the family, which in turn pays taxes on which the state depends to keep itself runny. The family is dependent upon the school to help children grow up to have process; the children become law-abiding, taxpaying citizens, who in turn support the state. If it goes well enough, the parts of society then must familiarise to recall a new order, stability, and productivity. Functionalism highlights the consensus and order that exist in society, which focuses on social stability and shared public values. From this perspective, ineffectiveness in the system, such as deviant behavior, this leads to change because common components which adjusts to achieve stability. As soon as one of the parts of the system isn’t working how it should or it is dysfunctional, it affects all other parts and creates social problems, which then leads to social change. Functionalism doesn’t encourage people to take part in an active role in changing their social atmosphere, even when such change may value them. Instead, functionalism sees active social change as unwanted because of the countless parts of the society will compensate obviously for any problems that may arise. According to the functionalist perspective of sociology, each feature of society is interdependent and contributes to society's stability and functioning as a whole. For example, the government provides education for the children of the family, which in turn pays taxes on which the state depends to keep itself running. The family is dependent upon the school to help children grow up to have good jobs so that they can raise and support their own families. In the process,
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