Social Contract Research Paper

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UNIT 5 INDIVIDUAL PROJECT HUMA 215 By Andre T. James AIU Online 09/28/2013 Abstract In this paper I will discuss the United States and how their economic, political and social structure. Many cultures change with growth their views on certain things will change over time with more influences from different cultures. I will also discuss social contracts and how they affect ones morals and what their cultures expects of them versus their views and values. Since its inception over 200 years ago, the United States…show more content…
At the highest level, the democratic government was formed by the founding fathers to have an explicit social contract with the people of the United States to carry forward the public best interest. This is the fundamental nature of a democratic government: there is an inherent, clear mechanism whereby those in authority can be removed if they are found in violation of the social contract to which they have agreed. This differs from monarchies and other systems of government where the social contract is less in favor of the people and has no built-in mechanism for removing those in power. The people of the United States agree to give up some of their rights in order to have the rest preserved through this contract, and the elected government in turn must maintain their end of that contract. Individual political parties sprang up from the demand to be able to compare and classify competing politicians based on their views; it become important to know, for example, which early politicians favored a strong central government (Federalists) or a more distributed government (Jeffersonian Republicans). Over time, these parties evolved to be rallying systems whereby politicians could galvanize their supporters. In the process, however, an implicit social contract was formed: individuals who subscribe to a party give up their right to make individual decisions on many issues in exchange for a strong party to fight for the…show more content…
We see this every four years during a Presidential election: politicians first assert their social contract with their party members, as well as those special interest groups that have agreed to support the party. Democrats try to prove who is more in line with their party's platform, and Republicans do the same. Politicians often have to deal with accusations of flip-flopping to demonstrate that they are satisfactorily in line with their own party. However, when it comes to the general election, the nominees are no longer beholden to their contracts with their parties so much as they are to their contract with the American people. After spending the primary season trying to prove they are most in tune with their party, they run for election on the basis of being most in tune with the nation. However, large swaths of the nation are at odds with the social contracts that politician holds with their party (or, otherwise, they would all be members of that party). This sets up the confusing political structure in American culture where politicians must first promise their parties they care strongly about certain issues, then assure the rest of the country that they do not actually care that strongly (Strom 1990). This confusing political structure emerges directly out of the conflicts in the
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