Slavery In Early America

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Slavery: it is the control, the possession of other people. It is the act of forcing another human being - another man, woman, or child - to do your labor for you. It is the complete denial of the inherent human rights we all take for granted every single day of our lives. It is evil, against all moralistic philosophy, and never should be done, yet it was commonly practiced for hundreds of years on a level that is comparative to the Holocaust in our very nation, America, which is widely regarded to be one of the most ethically sound nations in the world. Thus, the essential question to be considered is simple: why? Why did slavery become so accepted and so commonplace in a nation whose own foundations were built upon the ideas of liberty?…show more content…
It is obvious that anyone who accepts slavery accepts racism, yet it is empirically evident that in early America, colonists were not racist. One man, Anthony Johnson, who was black, was able to safely and without any repercussions purchase property, the defining mark of a man at this time as according to John Lockian philosophy. This shows that the white men, his neighbors and fellow countrymen, did not believe in racism at that time. However, as we follow the story of the life of the Johnson family to the end, we can see that as time went on and slavery became more popular, only then did racism truly become a popular phenomenon. Compared to the relatively easy access of property at the beginning of his life, when Anthony Johnson died, his property was seized by the government because he was considered to be an outsider due to the color of his skin. Thus, as slavery proceeded further in time in the American political and economic system, racism followed. It was not the other way around. Therefore, since it is known that racism was not a direct link to slavery, it must be argued that the only logical cause of racism, then, was a globalization mentality that was held by colonists and the British. The fact that the Spanish, the main competitors of the British, were…show more content…
The reasons for this were the new intellectual ideas coming out of Britain during the industrial revolution, mostly ideas from humanitarian philosophy. Contained in the new, rapid influx of late enlightenment philosophies was this new humanitarian philosophy that all men are created equal. While essentially reiterating most of the Lockian philosophy which dominated pre-slavery times, this put a great emphasis on combating the trend of slavery and breaking down all other barriers that limited any culture of man. The British government eventually came under this philosophy when they officially banned slavery in their country in the early 19th century. This put a huge damper on the triangular trade that put slavery in many other countries and thus led to the downfall of slavery in all modern countries. America, as the last remaining, important nation to have African slaves, finally ended its own slavery when the humanitarian philosophies of the British influenced the Abraham Lincoln’s North to conquer the South in the civil war. Thus, as morals once again flourished in the world, slavery was finally ended, bringing a stop to all of the terror and trauma that African slavery caused to millions of
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