Slave Trade In Ghana

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Ghana: slave trade to trade slaves Photographer Ian Berry travelled to Ghana with Christian Aid to document the impact of current international trade rules on farmers, traders and poor communities as they struggle to sustain their livelihoods. Just as the 18th century slave trade was about the abuse of economic power and foreign control, so international trading relations between rich and poor countries is much the same today. Is this trading injustice just a modern day slave trade? In Ghana, as in many developing countries, 70% of people earn their living from agriculture. Unfair trade rules forced on poor countries by the World Bank and IMF are having a disastrous effect on local farmers and are putting many of them out of business. Photographer Ian Berry travelled to Ghana with Christian Aid to document the impact of current international trade rules on farmers, traders and poor communities as they struggle to sustain their livelihoods. Just as the 18th century slave trade was about the abuse of economic power and foreign control, so international trading relations between rich and poor countries is much the same today. Is this trading injustice just a modern day slave trade? One of the most striking images of the exhibition was taken with Cape Coast Castle as an imposing backdrop to a thriving local fishing community. The centre was the capital of the British slave trade in West Africa for more than a century. Today the castle is a popular tourist attraction. In the 21st Century rich countries and financial institutions like the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank exert enormous control over the economies of poor countries like Ghana. Instead of being a means by which countries could work their way out of poverty, international trade works against the interests of poor communities Is this trading injustice just a modern

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