The significance of the house in Toni Morrison's Beloved

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In Toni Morrison’s Beloved, 124 Bluestone Road is of great significance in regards to the various themes of the story. This novel, a prominent example of gothic literature, uses extended metaphor to portray the house as a separate character, one that shadows over all the other characters. The house interacts thoroughly with its residents and their community, creating an epitome of the characters' emotions and actions: “The house houses things. Furthermore, it has an analogous association with the overall institution of slavery. It is observed that the house changes, as the story progresses, along with its inhabitants, and thus it is valid to say that the house was personified as a living force that cover all the incidents within Beloved. To the black community in the novel, the house signifies distinguished changes as the story develops. In the beginning, when Baby Suggs was still alive and well, the house is viewed with reverence, as Baby Suggs was a loved and respected preacher in the community. It is a common place where people come to eat and chat and find out information. However, all these appreciativeness soon turned into jealousy and paltry hatred, starting from the pie party and following with the witness of the tragic murder incident. Feeling strongly envious towards the family, the community refused to warn and defend Sethe from the arrival of schoolteacher, leading the fanatical but protective mother to commit an insupportable act. After observing Sethe’s deeds, the community backed away and terminates all communication with the house, viewing it with strong dislike, and perhaps fear. This also reveals the divided state of the community. Nevertheless, towards the end, the women of the area headed towards the house with a desire to help and conceivably a new feeling of friendliness, under the leadership of Ella. After viewing Denver out of her house and
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