Shirley Temple Black: Curbism

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Shirley Temple Over the 1900s to the 1940s many things happened like the Russian revolution or Picasso introducing cubism. Others things happening over this era were the Henry Ford assembly line, the holocaust, and the beginning of WW1. Among these many things happening, on April 23, 1928 a soon to be known star was born. This star was known as Shirley Temple Black. Shirley Temple Black was very confident and self-assured. Her career started when she first attended the Mrs. Meglin’s Dance Studio at only the age of three. Shortly after attending this dance studio Shirley became a famous Meglin kiddie. Also because of this Mrs. Meglin and a movie studio produced a series of shorts with children in sexual situations called Baby Burlesks. Some…show more content…
Eventually the studio built Shirley a life-size playhouse where she ate her meals and worked with her teacher. The goal of the studio was to maintain Shirley Temple’s uniqueness by protecting and further isolating her from the outside world. As Shirley aged she starred in her own favorite film, the Kipling adaptation of Wee Willie Winkie, this 9 year old Shirley worked hard to impress the director, John Ford. Other films included The Little Colonel and…show more content…
Shirley became the number 1 box-office attraction in Hollywood between 1934 and 1938, pulling her studio out of the red. An early hit was Bright Eyes where she costarred with one of her favorite leading men, James Dunn, also introducing her signature hit, On the Good Ship Lollipop. When Fox signed her in 1934, the studio abandoned the sexpot image and let her be what she really was, an energetic, resilient, good-natured young girl. Fox needed a star and during the first years of the Depression the studio was in grave financial trouble. Within a year of her withdrawal from Fox, Shirley Temple was signed for her comeback, plans made to team her with Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney for the Andy Hardy series, and then when that idea was hastily abandoned, Shirley was teamed with Garland and Rooney for the musical Babes on Broadway. However when the realization that both Garland and Rooney could easily upstage Temple, she was replaced for that film with Virginia Weidler. As a result, Temple's only film for Metro became Kathleen, a story about an unhappy teenager. The film was not a success and her MGM contract was canceled after mutual consent. The actress retired for almost two years from films, throwing herself into school
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