Schizophrenia No One Is To Blame

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Schizophrenia: No One Is To Blame Valeria Saucedo PSYC 2371 Abnormal Psychology April 23, 2014 ABSTRACT Schizophrenia is a mental illness that can have a extensive effect on the daily lives of those who have it; in school, the workplace, in social relationships and the simple ability to take care of themselves. With no exact statement of how schizophrenia is developed, scientist, researchers, doctor, etc., have found biological, genetic, psychological and environmental factors that could be responsible. There is a variety of symptoms associated with this illness, some which can cause bizarre behaviors and even lead to suicide. The best way to diagnose a person with schizophrenia is through a series of interviews, where professionals…show more content…
A periodic condition with symptoms that differ in intensity over time and has the potential to devastate the lives of people who are unfortunate enough to become a victim of this disorder known as schizophrenia. “When we dream, we usually believe that the bizarre things we’re experiencing are really happening. Your relative may feel that way when awake, having difficulty distinguishing between reality and the internal illusions taking place.” (Mueser, K.T., Gingerich, S., 2006) Schizophrenia has been described as “dreaming when you’re wide awake.” It is perhaps the most serious major psychiatric disorder, which affects how a person thinks, feels, and acts. There is no conclusive answer as to what causes the disorder, although theorists believe it is to be a combination of factors including genetics, pre-natal viruses, biological, and environmental…show more content…
(Mental Health America) The biological factor responsible is yet unknown, however scientists believe the illness has a biological cause involving some type of disturbance in the brain. (Mueser, Jeste, V., 2008) This idea is based on the most widely accepted biological theory known as Dopamine Hypothesis. An imbalance in the neurotransmitter dopamine is believed to exist in schizophrenia. Dopamine is known to be an important neurotransmitter that controls thoughts and feelings, both of which are disturbed in schizophrenia. The imbalance of these chemicals affects the way a person’s brain responds to stimuli, which would explain why a person with schizophrenia might be overwhelmed by sensory information (loud music or bright lights), which other people can easily cope with. This problem in processing different sounds, sights, smells and tastes can also lead to hallucinations or delusions. (Mental Health
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