Romeo and Juliet Quotes Essay

854 WordsJan 27, 20154 Pages
"Did my heart love till now? Foreswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night." "Go ask his name- if he is married, my grave is likely to be my wedding band!" "My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late!" "O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night as a rich jewel in Ethiop's ear; Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!" Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate! O any thing, of nothing first created; O heavy lightness! serious vanity! Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms! ROMEO Well, in that hit you miss: she'll not be hit With Cupid's arrow; she hath Dian's wit; And, in strong proof of chastity well arm'd, From love's weak childish bow she lives unharm'd. She will not stay the siege of loving terms, Nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes, Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold: […] BENVOLIO Then she hath sworn that she will still live chaste? (1.1.208-217) Romeo admits that Rosaline has vowed to remain "chaste" like "Diana," the goddess of virginity and hunting. In other words, Rosaline has sworn off boys and sex, which means that Romeo has no chance of winning her heart. What's interesting about this passage is that Romeo sounds a whole lot like a typical "Petrarchan lover." Petrarch, by the way, was a fourteenth-century Italian poet whose sonnets were all the rage in Renaissance England. In fact, Shakespeare's own collection of Sonnets are, in part, inspired by Petrarch's love poetry, which was written about "Laura," a figure who was as unavailable and unattainable as Romeo's current crush (Rosaline). Petrarchan poetry happens to contain a lot of metaphors that equate the pursuit of love with hunting and/or battle. In this passage, Romeo says that Rosaline is well "arm'd" against the "siege" of his love and "Cupid's arrow," which is

More about Romeo and Juliet Quotes Essay

Open Document