Roles Of A Midwife

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Midwives are known as one of the oldest professions. Also, unfortunately, the midwife profession can be defined as untrained and uneducated. Many people from centuries back that lived in colonies did not support the job of a midwife and to this day, there is still plenty of people that don't see the good and all the hard work that a midwife does. However, that is a misconception. Most people are not properly informed how midwives truly work and how highly respected they are by many cultures and by people. Midwives are brave and step up to do a job not many people are capable of doing. According to The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) there are approximately 11,826 certified nurse midwives (CNMs) in the United States. Most people are…show more content…
The term midwife comes from old English which means "with women" (Your Dictionary n.d.). Midwives have been around since people started having babies, so basically since the begging of history. Women were not trained to help pregnant women and they did not have the correct equipment to use, which was extremely risky for the mom's life and the baby's life. According to Judith Rooks, most midwives attended births in the American colonies practicing their skills at home and passing their skills to new generations. Midwives from West Africa migrated to America as slaves and gave practical help in births to not only black women but to white women as well (Rooks, 2014). Midwives were extremely respected by their community. In the first 250 years of the history colonies in North America, midwives outnumbered physicians by the amount of births they attended (Hanna, n.d.). Midwives met the need of this job and the community admired that (Hanna, n.d.). Midwives known as the "Granny Midwives" were elderly women. According to Cornelia Hanna, Granny midwives were selected by their communities, or they thought they were spiritually called to become a midwife. Many women felt more secure having a granny midwife attend their childbirth because they had been doing it for years and had much more experience than a beginner. Although granny midwives started off as any other…show more content…
Women wouldn't go to childbirth classes or couldn't access the internet if they were curious about something. All they knew is that they had to put all their trust in expert doctors. According to Cordelia Hanna, the father was not allowed to be in the delivery room with their significant other while she was giving birth. Women were sedated as well as the babies. Babies were often pulled out brutally with "metal spoon-like devices." After the baby was out the womb "they were held upside down and were spanked on their bottom to make them cry." From there, they were separated from their mothers and were moved to a whole different nursing room (Hanna, n.d.). Women started looking for a more natural birth with less drugs. This is where "lay" midwives entered the picture who are more often referred to as Direct-Entry Midwives. Direct-Entry midwives were the first-generation midwives. Women would experience their birth at home and began helping other women do the same. White middle-class women started choosing to have their births at home with the supervision of a "lay" midwife. The term "Directly-entry" means that the midwife entered the profession midwifery "directly" not through nursing or education (Rooks, 2014). By doing natural births at home women were able to empower their bodies. Their families and husband were able to attend the birth to give the loving support that women
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