Rococo vs Neoclassical

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Rococo vs. Neoclassical Art Periods
Over the years, works of art have developed and varied greatly across genres and time periods. From the cave paintings of the Paleolithic era to the abstract expressionism and Pop Art of the 21st century, we have seen styles of art evolve and develop. These styles and periods of art sometimes reflect past artists and styles and other times introduce an era of completely new art genres and styles. Two different art periods that succeeded each other is rococo and neoclassicism. Rococo is a style of art that began in the early to mid-18th century and was closely followed by the neoclassical art movement.
Rococo art originated in France in the early 18th century and was itself an evolution of the earlier style of baroque art. Rococo art emphasized elaborate, detailed, and ornamental elements in sculpture and architecture, and more realistic representations in paintings. Coming off the era of baroque art, which was very much influenced by religion and endorsed by the Catholic Church, rococo art thrived in a time where secularism was becoming a more dominant theme in social attitudes. This Age of Enlightenment saw a shift toward loosened morals and a light-heartedness in the social climate that was, in turn, reflected in the art of that time period. Some characteristics of Rococo art is light, airy colors and delicate, curling themes. In fact, the root word for rococo comes from the French word “rocaille” meaning “shell work” (MindEdge, 3.16). The subjects of Rococo art were usually people depicted in a light-hearted manner and frequently contained themes of indirect eroticism, or elements of love and romance, such as cherubs.
Following this art period, a new art movement emerged: Neoclassicism. In contrast to the way rococo art developed, basically as an evolution of the style before it, neoclassicism was a totally new and
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