Robert Jay Lifton's The Nazi Doctors

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The physicians in the Third Reich as talked about in Robert Jay Lifton’s book The Nazi Doctors were obviously able to reconcile their actions that they performed when the took the Hippocratic Oath. Basically everything that the Hippocratic Oath says the doctors of the Nazi party went against that. “I will follow that method of treatment which according to my ability and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patient and abstain from whatever is harmful or mischievous. I will neither prescribe not administer a lethal dose of medicine to any patient eve if asked nor counsel any such thing…” (Hippocratic Oath). Everything that the physicians of the Third Reich did was totally against that section of the Hippocratic…show more content…
It seems likely that the reason much of these things went unnoticed is because the upheavals of war pushed aside things of this nature. A quote from the book by Victor von Weizsaker says “For quite a number of doctors ... Hitler not only had the power of a commander in chief in a political sense, but was also the highest ranking physician.” That quote alone gives reason to why the doctors of the Third Reich were able to reconcile there actions. They believed everything Hitler was saying about a master race. In the doctors minds they believed that what Hitler was saying was completely true, what they were doing was to benefit Germany. In chapter two the book begins talking about how a plan had been put in place to start performing euthanasia. Some crucial work that fueled this project was a book by the title of “The Permission to Destroy Life Unworthy of Life,” this book was jointly written by two prominate professors in Germany, Karl Binding and Alfred Hoche. They argued and professionalized that destroying life that is “unworthy of life” is a healing treatment. A section from the book which explains what Alfred Hoche thought about…show more content…
From 1934, these hospitals were encouraged to neglect their patients; each year funds were reduced and state inspections of standards were either made perfunctory or suspended altogether. Especially important were courses held in psychiatric institutions for leading government officials and functionaries — courses featuring grotesque “demonstrations” orchestrated to display the most repulsive behavior of regressed patients — of “life unworthy of life.” After 1938, these courses were systematically extended to include members of the SS, political leaders of the Party, the police, prison officials, and the press. In the process the medical profession itself was made ready for the extraordinary tasks it was to be assigned (Lifton
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