Research Paper On HIPAA

928 Words4 Pages
HIPAA Of all the personal information that you might want to keep private, your medical records are the most important. That's why federal and state laws carry stiff penalties, up to and including jail time, for healthcare providers who let such data loose into the wild. In 1996, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (enacted August 21, 1996) was enacted by the United States Congress and signed by President Bill Clinton. The Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information (“Privacy Rule”) establishes, for the first time, a set of national standards for the protection of certain health information. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) issued the Privacy Rule to implement…show more content…
It is an act for the benefit of medical professionals/ doctors and patients. It provides protection to them. HIPAA is separated into two titles. The first title protects the coverage provided by health insurance policy covers for both employees and the families/dependants of these employees. The second title which is also known as the Administrative Simplification ensures protection of data pertaining to the personal information about the employees and their families/dependants and maintaining their confidentiality. It ensures that the personal data is prevented from become public unless if it is absolutely necessary or required. The main focus of the Administrative Simplification section of HIPAA bill is to minimize expenditure on healthcare spending. It has been whole-heartedly supported by the healthcare industry because it has resulted in standardization of online electronic transactions that constitute required standard record formats, code sets and identifiers. (2. Bennet…show more content…
At its core, privacy is experienced on a personal level and often means different things to different people. Most see privacy as allowing us the freedom to be whom and what we are as individuals. Yet, defining privacy has proven difficult,leading one legal scholar to opine, “Privacy is a value so complex, so entangled in competing and contradictory dimensions, so engorged with various and distinct meanings, that I sometimes despair whether it can be usefully addressed at all. The continued evolution of medical research in the age of genetics and electronic medical records depends on public support and trust. As many experts have pointed out, it is clearly the time for public dialogue on these issues.364 Better informing patients about the importance of medical research and the need for their health records to be accessed by researchers, as well as ensuring them of the confidentiality of their information could potentially go far toward minimizing the tension between privacy and research.
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