Rebellion: The Colonial Rebellion

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The Colonial Rebellion The American revolution was the huge political upturn of the British, by the American Colonists. After the French and Indian war, the British were left with a massive debt, even though they had won. So they taxed the Colonists, believing they should pay for their own defense. The Colonists had thought this to be unfair, and they snapped, thus marking the beginning of the American Revolution. The British Parliament passed several new laws, taxing the colonists, such as the Sugar Act (1764), which taxed foreign imports, the Currency Act (1764) which prohibited the printing of paper money, the Stamp Act (1765), which required a tax stamp on printed materials, the Quartering Act (1765), which required Colonists to let…show more content…
The Articles of Confederation showed how afraid the Colonists were of a strong central government, thus the Articles of Confederation created a very weak national government, full of weaknesses. The Articles of Confederation called for, well a confederacy, which gave all sovereign power to the states. This is stated in article two: "Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this Confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled." Also, the lack of a common currency, and the fact that congress could not tax the people directly, only ask for financial support, cause the country to slide into economic a down cline. There was no president to help lead the nation, and congress lacked money to build an army, so the United States was defenseless. Finally nine of thirteen states had to agree to alter the Articles of Confederation in any way. So, you could imagine the challenge it was to change the Articles. But Shays rebellion, which was a uprising led by Daniel Shay, made the Government see how weak it was, and it helped all the colonies agree on a change for the…show more content…
Since the British had almost all the power before, the states were reluctant to give power to a central government. But as I had stated before, this made congress not able to make money or control the states. The American Revolution was, as you can Imagine, an extremely important part in the history of the united states. (I mean if it hadn't happened, or if the Colonials had lost, we may all have bad teeth, strange accents, and a regular tea time every day.) But Seriously, I believe the American Revolution helped create a very well organized government of checks and balances that is still in use today. We learned not to put too much power in one person, or one part of the government, and we learned that each state should be unified and not have their own
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