Race And The Invisible Hand Summary

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Deirdre A. Royster is Associate Professor of Sociology at the College of William and Mary. Throughout Race and the Invisible Hand, Royster tries to discover why black men are somewhat less desirable as workers than their white peers. With extensive research and conductions of her own studies Royster seeks an answer in the experiences or 25 black men and 25 white men who graduated from the same vocational school and sought out jobs in the same blue-collar labor market in the early 1990s. Since the time of Booker T. Washington to today, black men have long been advised to “Get a trade.” But it is not as easy as it sounds. Royster seeks to expose the discrepancies of a workplace that favors the white job-seeker over the black by trying to understand…show more content…
Wilson argues that race was becoming less and less important in predicting the economic possibilities for well-educated African Americans. Since the black-led Civil Rights movement had been victorious in removing many racial barriers that made nearly impossible for well trained African Americans to gain access to appropriate educational and occupational opportunities. Wilson believed that this opened access that was unprecedented in the racial stratification system in the United States and that it would result in a noteworthy change and lasting gains for African American families with a quality amount of educational attainment. Research has only partially supported Wilson’s optimism. Yes blacks did experience significant educational and occupational gains during the 1970’s, their upward mobility has since tapered off, notably in the 1980’s and 1990’s. Scholars who even disagree with certain aspects of his thesis agree that this group needs special assistance in order to overcome the obstacles that they face. The Civil Rights era “victories” have not resulted in increasing percentages of blacks gaining access to college training. Most blacks attempt to establish careers with only so many credentials. Even though the vast majority of blacks are neither extremely poor nor particularly well educated; most blacks would be considered lower middle –or working-class and…show more content…
Everything relevant for wages that happens to them after secondary school could be affected by discrimination: post-secondary schooling, marriage, occupation, on-the-job learning, and so on. Under the assumption that there are no differences in discount rates of willingness to supply labor, the wag gaps observed during their careers would then represent the cumulative effects of labor market
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