Quinton Ross And The Scientific Revolution

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Quinton Ross The Scientific Revolution has had a dramatic impact throughout the world. It has helped us make scientific advancements, such as heliocentricity and atomism, helped us find flaws in our government, and allowed women to be involved in education,. Despite persecution from the Catholic Church, it made a difference in the world. The basis for the Scientific Revolution was the Scientific Method.1 This process uses logic and experimentation to explain works of the universe. This process removed blind adherence to tradition from science, and allowed scientists to logically find answers through the use of reasoning.1 One scientist by the name of Nicolaus Copernicus created the heliocentric model of the universe. This states…show more content…
Women in the Scientific Revolutionary Era had little to no training in sciences, so they had to read and study on their own. Mari Merian was the most gifted of all naturalists during the 17th and 18th centuries, but she was remembered not as a scientist but as an artist.3 She completed and published six collections of engravings of European flowers and insects.3 For example she painted caterpillars at every stage of development. The Countess of Cinchon, Ana Osorio was the first person to alert Europe to the medical properties of quinine bark brought back from Peru, because it had cured her malaria.3 The plant is named Cinchona Pubescens by Carl Linnaeus in Countess of Cinchon’s honor. It is native to the mountainous regions of tropical South America.3 Margaret Cavendish was an English aristocratic woman who taught herself mathematics, astronomy, and studies of the universe.3 She created fourteen books on everything from natural history to atomic physics. Emilie Chatelet was accepted into the foremost mathematical and scientific circles of Paris.3 As a physicist she earned a strong reputation, when she interpreted and translated the theories of Isaac Newton. Chatelet was forbidden to go the meetings at the Parisian coffeehouses where scientist, mathematicians, and…show more content…
Scientific advancements such as heliocentricity and atomism disproved geocentricity and Aristotelian beliefs. The Catholic Church supported many of those views and anyone who opposed those beliefs were made instant targets of the pope and his follwers.4 Punishments were very severe, including house arrest, to discourage scientific advancement, but some refused to give in to church demands. Aristotelian belief was that the Earth was the center of everything, which tied well into the churches’ misunderstanding of several bible verses. This misunderstanding caused the church to strictly promote the idea of an Earth-centered universe.4 Many scientists were persecuted, but Galileo was the most notable. With him inventing the one of the first telescopes, he could see multiple areas of space never seen before such as Jupiter. The most exceptional of these observations was Venus’ celestial pattern, which was explained by its revolution around the sun. Galileo’s views contradicted that of the Catholic Church and he was immediately put on trial after a letter he wrote to Duchess of Tuscany was discovered.4 Most of Catholic scientific doctrine came from pagan Greek philosophy. Examples of these were Aristotelian physics: the idea that there were only four elements fire, earth, air, and water.4 These ideas were later
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