Punishment During The Progressive Era

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Corrections The many forms of punishment exercised during the 1700’s included brutal tortures, beatings, branding, and mutilation. Some of the punishments involved, ripping the tongues out of people who choose to be liars, cutting of fingers or a hand of a thief, and adulterers would bare a scarlet letter. Aside from corporal punishment, the removal of the offender from the group was practiced regularly. The whipping post was common punishment for minor offenses such as drunkenness, slander, or stealing something of minor value. The wooden piece had holes for offenders’ hands and head, while they were in position others would throw rotten veggies or rocks at them. It was a physical form of painful punishment and embarrassment in the presence…show more content…
As a result of the brutality and extensive use of corporal and capital punishment, some were dissatisfied with these methods of responding to criminal behavior (Seiter, R. (2011). Utilizing these methods or forms of punishment was no longer acceptable. Prison building efforts in the United States came in three major components. Initially, during the Jacksonian Eraprisons were used for the purposes of imprisonment and rehabilitation labor. Majority of the states during the time of the Civil War began to utilize this method for most crimes. The second began after the Civil War and gained momentum during the Progressive Era, bringing a number of new mechanisms—such as parole, probation and indeterminate sentencing—into the mainstream of American penal practice. Finally, since the early 1970s, the United States had engaged in a historically unprecedented expansion of its imprisonment systems at both the federal and state level(Gottschalk,…show more content…
Auburn introduced the tier system, different levels of cells built above one another, in which convicts are housed according to their offense category ; first timers vs. repeaters, murderers vs. thieves, and so forth. Inmates wear uniforms of different colors, depending on their classification. The work regimen produces income that the Pennsylvania system could not generate, and this system is by far more cost effective and practical. Inmates are less likely to go mad, and it is easier to feed everyone in a group. The Auburn philosophy quickly becomes the model for prisons nationally and internationally. The Auburn systembecame known as the “congregate and silent” system, as officials continued to reduce the spread of criminal ideas by inmates through silence and strict discipline (Seiter, R.
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