Protestant Revivalism: The Second Great Awakening

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The Protestant Revivalism was most active during the 1790s and the 1840s.At the beginning of the late 1700s the Second Great Awakening appeared. It was a revival of the original Great Awakening. This Second Awakening, mostly took place in colleges. .It started in New England, but it certainly didn’t end there. It spread to western New York, Kentucky, Tennessee ,by the Appalachian Mountains and so on, where other social reforms also took place. With the new Christian revival, different sects and denominations started to take precedent. The most important, first and biggest meeting happened in Kentucky where even insolated frontier people got the chance to enjoy the emotional enjoyment. The Second Great Awakening , a reprise of…show more content…
So many people were grown tired of the long tirade speeches and the traditional Puritan and Catholicism traditions. Another is to shift the behavior of the downward spiraling middle class. Middle class families, especially men, were losing a constant battle to hard liquor that was very popular and cheaper than milk. In response to the over growing number of drunks, this movement emphasized on a strong work ethic,frugality and temperance. Overall on amending individuals lives. Charles Finney believed that in addition to other techniques, overall the Gospel was going save…show more content…
Including the Temperance Movement which decreased alcohol sales by 50%, the beginning of the Women’s Movement and the road to abolishing slavery. It also fundamentally altered the character of American religion which was the founding Second Great Awakening’s goal. At the start of the Revolution the largest denominations were Congregationalists (the 18th-century descendants of Puritan churches), Episcopalians, and Quakers. But by 1800, Evangelical Methodism and Baptists, were becoming the fasting-growing religions in the nation. The Second Great Awakening marked a fundamental transition in American religious life. The early American religious groups were Calvinist and believed they could only be saved by the grace of God. However this new movement preached and emphasized on the individual’s ability to change their life for the better and it also embraced on a “free will” so people of all over can commit to this: African Americans and women. The Second Great Awakening embraced a more optimistic view of the human condition. The repeated and varied revivals Its impact over these several decades helped make the United States a much more deeply Protestant nation than it had been
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