Protest Against Segregation

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How effective were protest against segregation the USA in the 1950s and the 1960s and why? Before the Civil Rights Movement, whites discriminated against African Americans. Blacks were not allowed to attend the same school or go to the same churches even; public facilities and transport was separated for the two groups. Blacks were also kept from voting. Organisations like the NAACP, The National Association for the advancement of Colored People, was set up in 1909 and campaigned against the `Jim Crow` laws. It attracted many members and received support from both Blacks and Whites. The Civil Rights movement gained momentum in the 1950s. In 1954 the Supreme Court decided that segregation in schools was unconstitutional. In 1955 a black women,…show more content…
They set up the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). In the early 1960s they preformed `Sit-in` protests, a campaign to desegregate lunch tables in public cafes. The Congress of Racial Equality had been established in the 1940s by James Farmer. In 1961, CORE activists began a form of protest called `Freedom rides` a campaign to desegregate public transport anywhere in the USA. In the following year Congress passed the Civil Rights Act. This law banned discrimination in school, public places, jobs and many other fields. African Americans received the right to vote in 1967. In 1957, the Supreme Court ordered the Governor of Arkansas, to let nine black students attend a white-only school in Little Rock, Arkansas. Because of lack of communication Elizabeth Eckford, one of the nine students, she was forced to march up the street alone with people shouting insults. Violence broke out and troops had to be sent to make sure that the students could attend school safely. This was quite effective as a result of 2,600 African American students were attending a white-only school. To put African Americans and white children in the same classrooms was very effective because such a change was meant to alter the attitudes and socialization of children at the youngest of ages meant the end to segregated schools as children had become accused to sharing facilities with the black race. Although…show more content…
This was because they wanted to be able to travel on public transport without having segregated facilities. The black Americans used white –only facilities to challenge the law. The freedom riders were attacked by white mobs and beaten with bicycles chains, clubs and baseball bats. There was very little police protection for the freedom riders. The campaign gained a lot of media coverage and did a huge amount to raise awareness of how black Americans were treated in the southern states this was very effective because having a lot of people know how black people were treated would change their opinion on black people and also put pressure on the government because he couldn’t side with the whites who were abusive and blacks who were performing non-violent protest as well as having to stay government with all the
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