Pros And Cons Of Future Policing Proposal

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Future of Policing Proposal CJA/214 February 21, 2013 Boris Robinson M.A Policing Proposal There are numerous skeptical theories regarding as to why implementing new procedures or trends into policing would be beneficial however, the pros and cons are rarely comprehended or sufficiently judged. Some examples of current studies toward future policing are drone technology and aerial surveillance, and biometrics. Many people and agencies obviously have their opinions both negative and positive. Adverse theories mainly consist of available funds for research and development and its consistency. Knowledge does not come easily or cheaply and the research revolution in policing is the product of a large…show more content…
The 4th amendment is typically the most common concern; the protection under the Constitution of the United States governs the right against unlawful search and seizure (Bradley, 2013). With drones flying over private property the 4th amendment could appear to be compromise citizen. Also the 14th amendment constitutes the right to be left alone. Again, the amendments are open to interpretation. There is no “consensus in law on how data collected can be used, shared or stored” (Sengupta, 2013). Police departments using UAV’s to patrol have to request clearance from the Federal Aviation Administration. The reason the Federal Aviation Administration must be notified is to avoid collision with other aircrafts. These police aircrafts also have a short battery span, which sometimes result in abrupt landing that may lead to unnecessary search for the aircraft. In turn it seems that many of the negative aspect concerning drone technology fall under a violation of rights, and the efficiency. If law enforcement agencies around the country implemented drones into their departments not only would the agencies be able to get eyes on a situation more quickly but could also act as a deterrent because a criminal will never know where the drone is. According to (Copeland, 2011), the Federal Aviation Administration has pushed local…show more content…
Unfortunately, if one is not registered through the system how would they be tracked? This is one flaw within the system. If a particular law enforcement agency preform a test to match information and is unsuccessful, chances are that the individual may have never been in contact with the law previously. Civilians who wish to be protected may volunteer this information in order to believe or think they are protected. A criminal or potential criminal will not volunteer this information willingly. This also falls into a civil matter where one does not have to provide personal information because it is a violation of one’s privacy, according to the Constitution. The chances of an identifier being incorrect are almost zero because each person has a distinct value or trait, making it hard to deny. Finger- printing and hand scans are accurate and distinct and require very little computer space this also provides access for many law enforcement officers to deal with unresolved case. Retina or iris scans are high in accuracy for identifying a person but is not commonly used among identifying criminals. This particular process could be beneficial in identifying high risk and profiled criminals if the need arose. DNA is one human
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