Policing Terrorism: Post 9/11

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Policing Terrorism: Post 9/11 According to the Code of Federal Regulations, terrorism is defined as the unlawful use of force and violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives. The FBI goes even further with describing terrorism as either domestic or international, which depends on the origin, base, and objectives of the terrorist organization. Domestic terrorism is the unlawful use, or threatened use, of force or violence by a group or individual based and operating entirely within the United States or Puerto Rico without foreign direction committed against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof in furtherance of political or social objectives. International terrorism involves violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or any state, or that would be a criminal violation if committed within the jurisdiction of the United States of any state. International terrorist acts occur outside the United States or transcend national boundaries in terms of the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they appear intended to coerce or intimidate, or the locale in which their perpetrators operate or seek asylum. (FBI, 2002-2005) The United States experience what is known as the worst terrorist attacks in history on September 11, 2001 also known as 9/11. President Bush’s national security adviser, Condoleezza Rice was interviewed by CNN just shy of the anniversary of these attacks, during this interview he stated, “History shows us that inaction is the problem, and the vulnerability of the United States is really what came home very, very clearly on 9/11. We’ve been a country that’s been fortunate to be

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