Plagirism Essay

892 WordsMar 21, 20094 Pages
Plagiarism Are there thieves in the classroom? This is the question that educators have to face everyday. They are not looking for the people responsible for bank robberies or home break-ins. Rather, they have to be aware of students committing theft of intellectual property. As the Internet started growing and its use increased, the opportunity for plagiarism grew tremendously. The accessibility of information and articles has become far more advanced, thus opening the door for misuse and theft of intellectual property. Students might plagiarize for several reasons: time constraints due to procrastination, peer pressure, pressure to make the grade, the excitement of stealing, or an easy “A” (http://www.plagiarism.org/learning_center/educational_tips.html). Regardless of the reason, it’s never a valid or ethical excuse to plagiarize. I will review three examples of plagiarism (recycling a friends essay, verbatim use of an article without citing, and paraphrasing to mask plagiarism), ways to avoid each example, and the potential consequences. Recycling a friends essay is one type of recycling that is not good for the environment. Throughout a student’s collegiate career they will have a multitude of essays and papers to construct. In many instances the student will have friends that may have attended the same classes with the same instructors or taken a similar class at a different school. With the pressure to achieve exceptional grades increases, students might have the need to seek help from their peers (http://www.plagiarism.org/learning_center/educational_tips.html). A proactive way to avoid this kind of pressure is to create a very specific plan to complete each assignment (http://www.plagiarism.org/learning_center/preventing_writing.html#write). Once the plan is created, strict adherence is a critical next step. If a student fails to maintain their plan,

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