Pertussis Essay

1225 WordsJun 17, 20145 Pages
Pertussis Introduction of the Disease Whooping cough, also known as Pertussis, is a highly transmitted disease caused by the Bordetella pertussis bacterium (http://diseases.emedtv.com/whooping-cough/whooping-cough-in-adults.html). Bordetella pertussis attaches to the cilia (which are small, hair-like) extensions that line part of the upper respiratory system (http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/causes-transmission.html). The bacteria releases toxins, which harm the cilia and cause swelling. Pertussis can only be found in humans and is spread by person to person. Those who are around people that are affected with pertussis can get pertussis by coughing or sneezing while in close contact. Before, when vaccines for pertussis didn’t exist, it was known to have 5,000-10,000 deaths in the United States (http://ww2.dcmilitary.com/stories/011708/pentagram_28068.shtml). Symptoms Pertussis begins with cold-like symptoms and sometimes with a mild cough or fever. After the first two weeks, harsh coughing can begin. In infants, the cough can be little or non-existent. They may experience a symptom called “apnea." Apnea is a paused in the child’s breathing pattern (http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/complications.html). It’s said to be that pertussis is critical for babies. About 50% of infants younger than one year of that are affected by pertussis are hospitalized (http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/complications.html). Being affected with pertussis can cause you to have severe and rapid coughing, over and again, until the air releases from the lungs and you are forced to breathe in with an intense “whooping” sound. The excessive amount of coughing can cause a person to throw up and be very fatigued. Pertussis divides into three stages: catarrhal, paroxysmal, and convalescent. Stage 1: Catarrhal · Runny nose · Sneezing · Low-grade fever ·

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