Personal Perception In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein '

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Kraindy Katz English Composition 2 Frankenstein Application Essay October 18, 2013 Personal Perception Personal perception indicates the feelings we formulate of other persons in our head, and the interpretations we assume about these persons are based on the thoughts and feelings we formulate. “Whenever we meet new people, we immediately form our personal perception on the person in our mind, usually based on observing the person, the situation in which we got to know him, and on our own personal characteristics” (Bargh 235). Contemplate the case in point of a customer purchasing food in a market and has never yet met the lady at the checkout counter. The customer will formulate an opinion about the lady with almost no more information…show more content…
It is human nature to deem the unnatural and irregular as immoral, as articulated in the declaration, “Humans use language, their visual and verbal constructions of reality, to name or image the human and the nonhuman and thus to fix the boundaries between us and them” (Mellor 124). Through continually demoralizing the creature by considering him evil, the characters in the novel ultimately cause the creature to behave monstrously. The reader never essentially gets to meet the creature, but the reader formulates an impression of the creature in his/her head, centered on the creature’s physical descriptions, and by reading about the creatures environment, and by the circumstances under which the readers get acquainted with the…show more content…
Thus said, it is unfair to judge a person without first really getting to know that person. The creature was born with a regular and natural desire to love and to be loved, but ultimately, the rejection he faced among his people caused him to reject them and become evil. References Bargh, J. A., Chen, M., & Burrows, L. (1996). Automaticity of social behavior: Direct effects of trait construct and stereotype activation on action. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71, 230-244. Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft. Frankenstein, Or, The Modern Prometheus. New York: Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, 2009. Print. Mellor, A.K. (1988) Chapter 7 of Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters New York: Methuen, Problems of Perception,
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