Parks And Colvin: The Icon And Non-Celebrity

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Parks and Colvin: The Icon and Non-Celebrity Darryl R. Barkley ENG 220 December 22, 2014 Professor Marie Loggia-Kee Parks and Colvin: The Icon and Non-Celebrity Throughout the Jim Crow era, many African Americans rebelled against segregated seating in public transportation, but their number vastly increased after World War II (Schwartz, 2009). In 1955, racial segregation on buses in Montgomery, Alabama, ignited what is historically known as the Montgomery Bus Boycott. While the boycott lead to a decision by the Supreme Court to end segregated seating, it would not have been possible without the sacrifices made by Rosa Parks and Claudette Colvin. Both Parks and Colvin, upon boarding the National City Lines Bus…show more content…
Greenshaw (2010) suggested that the arrest initiated the Montgomery bus boycott as Parks stated, "I think we ought to call a boycott." Immediately, Parks became the mother of the Civil Rights Movement. "I was just one of many who fought for freedom," she said in her book Quiet Strength (Greenhaw, 2010). Shortly after the boycott started, it was determined that Parks would be the lead plaintiff in the federal case against the Montgomery City bus company. At the time of Parks’ arrest, she was 42-years-old, and well known and well liked throughout the black community. She had been married for 23 years and has established herself with the civil rights community working with the NAACP. It was for these reasons that Parks seemed to have the attributes needed to take the lead on the federal case. However, she was convicted on December 5, 1955 and her lawyer filed an appeal with the Alabama appeals courts. According to Schwartz (2009), Parks’ case, while on appeal with the State court, her federal case could not be heard until the state had acted. Therefore, a decision was made to proceed with the federal case by developing a group of plaintiffs that did not include…show more content…
However, both Parks and Colvin role was equal in that a single role could not survive on its own. Put differently, “Court’s decisions alone could not end public hostility or segregation” (Schwartz, 2009). Parks role help bring the community together to rally against segregation while Colvin’s case was used to advance the suit that eventually lead to the court decision that ended desegregation. Therefore, it is fair to state that Parks and Colvin had pivotal roles in what lead to desegregation. In conclusion, Parks and Colvin, both civil rights activists, fought for freedom and equal rights. Although both were arrested and convicted of the same crime, Parks became an icon of the civil rights movement against racial segregation thereby gaining a celebrity status. Colvin's celebrity status, on the other hand, was halted due to her moral transgressions. However, Colvin eventually played a vital role in the desegregation laws that preceded the Browder v. Gayle decision. Parks and Colvin, both equally responsible for the civil rights movement that
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