Once More To The Lake Precis

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Narration Précis: In “Once More to the Lake” (1941), author E. B. White subtly asserts that despite great growth in time, it is not impossible for there to be very little change whatsoever concerning morality. White illustrates this concept by vividly describing the amazingly accurate similarities between his own performances as a youth and his son’s through stylistically pleasing syntax (“I began to sustain the illusion that he was I, and therefore, by simple transposition, that I was my father”), humorous remarks (“Peace and goodness and jollity. The only thing that was wrong now, really, was the sound of the place…”), and providing constant light-hearted flashbacks to his own childhood (“I kept remembering everything… all was just…show more content…
Tannen supports this belief by way of physical comparisons (“… I found myself looking at the three women at the table, thinking how each had a different style and how each style was coherent”), grammatical theories (“The unmarked forms of most English words also convey “male.” Being male is the unmarked case. Endings like ess and ette mark words as “female.” Unfortunately, they also tend to mark them for frivolousness”), societal observations (“All married women’s surnames are marked. If a woman takes her husband’s name, she announces to the world that she is married and has traditional values… If she does not take her husband’s name, this too is marked, seen as worthy of comment: She has done something; she has “kept her own name”), and specific references to other ideas that support her claim (“I have never been inclined toward biological explanations of gender differences in language, but I was intrigued to see Ralph Fasold bring his biological phenomena to bear on the question of linguistic marking in his book The Sociolinguistics of…show more content…
Buckley Jr. asserts that “… we are all increasingly anxious in America to be unobtrusive, we are reluctant to make our voices heard, hesitant about claiming our right…” which is why the American people simply deal with unacceptable issues on a day to day basis. Buckley justifies his assertion through multiple examples that include the use of an anecdote (“It was the very last coach and the only empty seat on the entire train, so there was no turning back…”), ironic incidents (“Suddenly my New Year's Eve resolution struck me. It was now or never… ‘If you are not too busy… would you mind handing me a screwdriver?’ Work stopped and everyone turned his eyes on me, and I experienced that mortification I always feel when I am the center of centripetal shafts of curiosity, resentment, perplexity. ‘I am sorry, sir… I am not supposed to move. I have just had a heart attack.’”), and subtle humor (“… fifteen minutes ago she spoke unctuously into the loudspeaker the words undoubtedly devised by the airline's highly paid public relations counselor: ‘If there is anything I or Miss French can do for you to make your trip more enjoyable, please let us – ‘ I have run out of
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