Old Testament Primary Resources

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Genesis Primary Resources Calvin, John, volume 1 of Calvin’s Commentaries (1563) Archer, Gleason, A Survey of Old Testament Introduction (1974) Davis, John, Paradise to Prison: Studies in Genesis (1975) Geisler, Norman, A Popular Survey of the Old Testament (1977) Sailhamer, John, “Genesis” in volume 2 of The Expositor’s Bible Commentary (1990) Egner, David, “Knowing God Through Genesis” (1991) Benware, Paul, Survey of the Old Testament in Everyman’s Bible Commentary (1993) Walton, John, Chronological and Background Charts of the Old Testament (1994) Hamilton, Victor, The Book of Genesis (2 vols.) in The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (1990 & 1995) Mathews, Kenneth, Genesis 1-11:26 and Genesis 11:27-50:26 in The New American…show more content…
On day three, God caused these waters to recede, forming seas and causing the dry land to appear (1:9-10). Once the dry land appeared, God created the plants and trees also on day three (1:11-12). That the plants and trees God created were seed-bearing and fruit-bearing, respectively, points to the fact that the things God created were created mature, with the appearance of age. 1:14-19 (Day 4: creation of the sun, moon, and stars) Many authors have pointed out an interesting correspondence between the days of creation (day one corresponding to day four; day two to day five; and day three to day six). When first created, the universe was formless and empty (“without form, and void” in 1:2). Through the days of creation, God formed (days 1-3) and filled (days 4-6) the universe He created.30 The following chart is from Egner (p. 9): expresses graphically God’s claim of lordship over the creatures” (Gerhard Von Rad, quoted in Davis, p. 62). “Firmament” is derived from the Latin Vulgate’s translation of this word, firmamentum, meaning something made solid (Ross, p. 109). 29…show more content…
For the first time, God gives a negative evaluation, declaring the solitude of Adam “not good” (v. 18; cf. “good” in 1:4, 10, 12, 18, 21, and 25 and “very good” in 1:31). Based on this evaluation, God determined to “make [Adam] an help meet for him” (v. 18; cf. 1 Corinthians 11:9). Lest one think that the role of “help” is a demeaning one, consider the fact that the same Hebrew word is used of God Himself throughout the Old Testament (see Exodus 18:4, Deuteronomy 33:7, 26, 29, 1 Samuel 7:12, Psalm 20:2, 33:20, 46:1, 115:9-11, 124:8, and 146:5). As the man’s helper, the woman would provide what was lacking in man, supplying what man in and of himself could not, i.e., without the woman, the man could not be complete. “Meet for him” literally means “corresponding to him.”49 Eve was the only one who corresponded to Adam, because she was the only other being created in the image of God (“male and female” in 1:27). To drive this point home to Adam, God brought all the various species of land animals and birds to Adam50 to be named51 (vs. 19-20a), an exercise that apparently caused Adam to realize this deficiency (v. 20b). To remedy this deficiency, God anesthetized Adam with “a deep sleep” (v. 21; cf. 15:12), removed one of his ribs, and from it created52 Eve (vs. 21-22). While God could have created Eve in the same manner He created Adam, it may very well be that He chose the manner He did in
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