Of Mice and Men Essay the Relationship of George and Lennie

1129 WordsMay 19, 20145 Pages
Jack Wilkins October 8th, 2013 3rd Period Jack Wilkins October 8th, 2013 3rd Period John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men tells the tragic tale of George and Lennie, two companions forced to drift from job to job in order to make a living. Arriving at a new farm full of characters embodying loneliness, the pair dreams of escape from the vicious cycle of isolation that accompanies life as a migrant worker before they ultimately succumb to Naturalism’s cruel fate themselves. Lennie and George keep each other going, both of them providing the fuel for the other. The two also give hope to the characters around them; their dreams for “defiance of the cycle” inspires others to attempt escape from the chains of Naturalism themselves. But, even as the relationship of George and Lennie is beautiful and rare, it is also heartbreaking, for the contrast between the pair’s aspirations and the final result of their struggle sharply illustrates the tragedy of Naturalism. The extraordinary nature of the relationship between George and Lennie eludes conventionality in that not only does the pair keep each other alive, but their relationship blazes defiance towards the forces of Naturalism. Naturalistic thought depicts a cruel force dictating the actions of humans, and nowhere does this idea seem more apparent than in the lonely lives of the farmhands depicted in Of Mice and Men. The song “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” exhibits this isolation: “I walk a lonely road / the only one that I have ever known / ... I walk alone.” As sung in this Green Day classic, the men on the farm have known only solitude and hardship due to their inability to escape Naturalism’s clutches. George and Lennie thwart this cycle, however, by having one to look out for the other. George put it this way to Lennie. "Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family.
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