Nixon Doctrine Research Paper

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Nixon Doctrine Vanessa Hayes Professor Maloney POL300042VA016-1128-001 Contemp Intl Problems December 9, 2012 President Richard Nixon announces that henceforth the United States will expect its Asian allies to tend to their own military defense. The Nixon Doctrine, as the president's statement came to be known, clearly indicated his determination to "Vietnamize" the Vietnam War. When Richard Nixon took office in early 1969, the United States had been at war in Vietnam for nearly four years. The bloody conflict had already claimed the lives of more than 25,000 American troops and countless Vietnamese. Despite its best efforts, the United States was no closer to victory than before. At home, antiwar protesters were a constant presence…show more content…
On July 24, he met the Apollo 11 astronauts on their return from the moon landing, a highly symbolic American victory in the space race. On the next day, at a press conference in Guam, he tried to adapt U.S. foreign policy to the pressures of the Vietnam War, which were stretching the military's ability to meet America's global commitments. He resisted calls to withdraw American ground forces from Vietnam immediately, and searched for a way to reinvigorate U.S. alliances around the world, hoping to maintain American credibility while sharing the burden of Western defense. Over the next several months, the president and his advisers worked to clarify and codify his initial comments, an effort that led to the simple formulation of the Nixon Doctrine included in a famous November 3, 1969, speech: - First, the United States will keep all of its treaty commitments. - Second, we shall provide a shield if a nuclear power threatens the freedom of a nation allied with us or of a nation whose survival we consider vital to our…show more content…
allies would take the lead fighting conventional wars, because "defense of freedom is everybody's business . . . particularly the responsibility of the people whose freedom is threatened." The U.S. would bolster its allies' defense and provide those aspects that the allies could not provide themselves, especially nuclear deterrence. The result would be to reduce the cost to the United States of its alliances, especially in terms of relatively scarce American military manpower. Motivated local troops would also be likely to understand the details of conflicts better than intervening American forces, and their knowledge of the history, the local dialects, and the local terrain might offer important intelligence and military advantages”(Gholz, 2009). The Nixon Doctrine's Cold War context is long gone, but some of the detailed circumstances confronting the United States make the comparison between 1969 and 2009 seem uncomfortably apt. And a number of experts and pundits have drawn analogies between the long, politically controversial counterinsurgency efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan and the Nixon-era struggle in
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