New England Colonies Dbq

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The New England settlements grew rapidly and quickly through the mid 1600s. The colonies advancement was to a great extent impacted by the Puritans, who had helped discover the vast majority of the settlements in the region subsequent to emigrating from Britain. The methods of philosophies, ideals, and values of the Puritans extraordinarily formed the improvement of the colonies. Politically, the thought of a united, delegate government or theocracy was taken from Puritan ideals. Economically, the beliefs of reasonable prices and taxation originated from the Puritans. Socially, accentuation on church, religion, and community was another enduring impact of the Puritans. The Puritans dramatically influenced the Political, economic, and social…show more content…
As said by John Winthrop, "Wee must be knitt together...as one man..wee must delight in eache other, make other's conditions our own..." (Doc. A). The concept of unity and devotion to one another and to a government greatly molded future advancement in the New England colonies. Furthermore the religion-driven methodology of the New England colonies additionally has its roots in Puritan ideology. The Enlarged Salem Covenant of 1636 proclaims, "We will do nothing to the offence of the church...we do hereby promise to carry ourselves in all lawful obedience to those that are over us, in church or commonwealth." (Doc. C). This unflinching pride and commitment to both church and commonwealth (or government), and additionally their respective rules and regulations, again molds the New England colonies. A third intriguing political impact is the origin of religious opportunity, or at least the demand for it. In spite of the fact that the Puritans were famously enthusiastic to their own confidence, even in those times the sobs for religious resilience were available. Roger Williams, later the founder of Rhode Island, pleads, "God requireth not a…show more content…
Primarily, this influence could be seen as a strong emphasis on church & education. As seen in Doc. B, a map of a colonial New England town shows the center of a normal Puritan town. Of those buildings, prominently featured are both the church and the school. The church was the religious and social center of a Puritan town, occupying a central position. The close-knit towns allowed for the church to monitor the behavior of the people in the town more closely. The strong belief in religion in these towns caused the Puritans to consider themselves as anointed by predetermination: As put by William Bradford, a governor, after a battle against some Native Americans, "...and they gave the praise thereof to God...who had wrought so wonderfully a [victory]" (Doc D). The faith in religion & church is also shown by the clearly labelled "Minister;s House" on the map, right next to the church. The Puritan adoration for religion likewise drove them to educate their children in similar fashion. In comparison to all other colonies, The New England colonies had the best education system, focused on religion and reading/writing greatly due to the Puritans ideals and valued. The school is the third largest building in the town, second to only the town hall and church. Advanced educational opportunities were also asseible; to "Advance learning...it pleased God to stir up the heart of one Mr.
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