Native American Tragedy

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Tragedy is an inescapable undertone in North American history. The word inescapable is appropriate because it is truly impossible to ignore or disregard the inherent sorrow and loss that accompanies so many historical events in the continent’s past. The history of America’s cultural achievements and geographic expansion must be tempered by constant reminder of the unseen or outright ignored costs it charged upon Native Americans. There are many sources that use of the term “Indian genocide” to describe the destruction of Indigenous peoples of the American continent since the arrival of Europeans. It turns out that the massacres of the Native American populations are not officially registered to date among the genocides indentified by the United…show more content…
Holocaust means sacrifice, God, purpose”[6] In fact, "Holocaust" comes from the the Greek word holokauston, itself a translation of the Hebrew olah, meaning "completely burnt offering to God," implying that Jews and other "undesirables" murdered during World War II were a sacrifice to God. In other word, Holocaust has the same meaning as genocide, it is the same purpose but it only defines the tragic fate of the Jews during WWII. But the questions here are, are the others victims of Nazis included, and all other genocides across the centuries? Does the Holocaust not include them too? While the term ‘Shoah’ the Hebrew word for "catastrophe," is the preferred name by the Jews and most commonly use in France for example. I think ‘Shoah’ is the right word to use when we talk about what happened to the Jews during WWII, while Holocaust means genocide and should be use to describe any genocide and mass murder, the Holocaust wasn’t the only Genocide on Earth and Nazis did not only killed Jews but also many mentally disabled, communists, homosexuals and other ‘undesirables’. In other words, who owns the word 'Holocaust' and the memory it contains? Does this word is not also applicable to the massacre of Indians in America? I think it…show more content…
Their ideologies were practically the same. In 1869, General Phillip Sheridan of the US Army said “The only good Indian is a dead Indian[10]”, later Adolf Hitler will say “Jews represent the lowest form of human being. My first and foremost task will be to annihilate them.[11]” Indians and Jews were seen as subhuman, harmful, parasites. The Europeans saw themselves as the superior culture bringing civilization to an inferior culture, which bring forced assimilation and the boarding schools for example. Whereas the Nazis didn’t wanted to convert the Jews or assimilate in the Christians life, they just wanted to killed them; erased their race from the planet. Moreover, Adolph Hitler didn't just dream up the idea for the Nazi Concentration Camps, he had examples. And one of the best examples of the time was American Indian Reservations of the 19th century. “Hitler’s concept of concentration camps as well as the practicality of genocide owed much, so he claimed, to his studies of English and United States history… and often praised to his inner circle the efficiency of America’s extermination – by starvation and uneven combat – of the red savages who could not be tamed by captivity.”[12] The term “Final solution” was not coined by the Nazis. It was General of the US Army William Tecumseh Sherman, who plotted out the panned murder to take care of the “Indian problem.” Over 100
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