Munich Agreement Essay

17437 WordsDec 19, 201070 Pages
\server05\productn\C\CAC\5-2\CAC210.txt unknown Seq: 1 18-JUN-04 8:41 THE MUNICH PACT OF 1938: ADR STRATEGIES FOR OUR TIME? Lionel D. Warshauer * INTRODUCTION Fresh off the peace agreement that was negotiated at Munich on September 29, 1938, 1 British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain 2 proclaimed to the crowd assembled at No. 10 Downing Street: 3 “My good friends, for the second time in our history, a British Prime Minister has returned from Germany bringing peace with honor. 4 I believe it is peace for our time. . . Go home and get a nice quiet sleep. . .” 5 Instead of “a nice quiet sleep,” Britain and the continent of Europe were plunged into six years of devastating world war when Adolf Hitler 6 invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, thus forcing Britain and France to declare war on Germany. 7 * Executive Editor, Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution, J.D. Candidate, June 2004. I would like to thank Professor Curtis Pew for his invaluable help and insight in guiding this Note to publication. I would also like to thank my parents and sister for their encouragement and support throughout the whole process. Special thanks also to Professor Hal Abramson. 1 See THE MUNICH PACT [hereinafter “THE PACT”], September 29, 1938, available at http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/imt/document/munich1.html (last visited Apr. 6, 2004). Pursuant to the Pact, Britain and France, on behalf of Czechoslovakia, ceded four zones of territory, known as the Sudetenland, which contained several million ethnic Germans, to Nazi Germany. See id. 2 Chamberlain was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1937-1940, http://www. spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/PRchamberlain.htm (last visited Nov. 14, 2002). 3 The traditional residence of Britain’s Prime Minister. 4 See TELFORD TAYLOR [hereinafter “T. TAYLOR”], MUNICH: THE PRICE OF PEACE 64 (Garden City, New

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