Monty Python Gawain And The Green Knight Analysis

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|Arthur's Unrealism: Monty Python, Gawain and the Green Knight, and the Destruction of Ideals | It may be that ideals are necessary for humanity. Without idealized images, codes of behavior, even idealized objects, mankind would have difficulty functioning. There would be a lack of context or criteria with which to judge objects that may be termed less than ideal. However, the problem with idealized images is that they can never be described fully, and certainly never attained. An example is the contemporary ideal of feminine beauty, which has led to countless problems such as depression and psychological dietary disorders among women who perceive themselves to be "inadequate." The more culturally emphasized an ideal…show more content…
When Monty Python's Galahad must face the final test at the Bridge of Death, he is one of the two knights who perish for failure to answer the riddles; perhaps he dies also for having failed to be what his title terms him, just as Sir Robin the Not-Quite-So-Brave dies for his flaw. In Gawain and the Green Knight, the temptation in an analogous castle is again that of the hostess, "Her bright throat and bosom fair to behold, fresh as the first snow fallen upon hills." (Lines 956-7) However, the critique of chastity is entirely on the grounds of sinning in thought and not in deed. Whereas Galahad the Chaste was perfectly willing to give up his chastity, Gawain is not willing--but he does consider it. The temptation is presented is much less lustful terms in the poem. The lady offers herself using remarkably similar terms to those used by the Anthrax women, who say first to spank them, and then to "do with them as you [Galahad] will[s]." In the poem the lady uses these…show more content…
H. The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume One, Fourth Edition (New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1979). Barron, W. R. J. Trawthe and Treason: The Sin of Gawain Reconsidered (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1980). Benson, Larry D. Art and Tradition in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1965). Blanch, Robert J. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: A Reference Guide (Troy, NY: The Whitston Publishing Co., 1983). Goltra, Robert. "The Confession in the Green Chapel: Gawain's True Absolution" in The Emporia State Research Studies, vol. xxxii, no. 4, Spring 1984 (Emporia, Kansas: Emporia State University), pp. 5-14. Kittredge, George Lyman. A Study of Gawain and the Green Knight (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1916). Savage, Henry Lyttleton. The Gawain-Poet: Studies in his Personality and Background (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1956). Shoaf, R. A. The Poem as Green Girdle: Commercium in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Gainesville, FL: University of Florida, 1984). Thompson, John O., editor. Monty Python: Complete and Utter Theory of the Grotesque (London: British Film Institute,
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