Mentees Study

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Desirable Qualities of Mentors and Mentees Requires for a Succesful Mentoring Experience Other mentors’ expectations mainly can be characterized as ideal characteristics they want to see in their mentees. In Hudson's (2013) study mentors wish their protégés to be enthusiastic to teach and be ready to form quality and reciprocal relationship with the mentor, implying by that such qualities as “being an attentive listener, a good communicator, socially confident, and having a sense of humour” (p. 109). Apart from that, mentors want their mentees to be committed to the teaching profession and to children, promote lifelong learning (eager to learn and develop new knowledge), be reflective regarding their own practice and the mentor's feedbacks…show more content…
According to the study by Hall et al. (2008), teachers attribute several common responsibilities to the mentors, known as: support, supervision of the assignments done by a pre-service teacher, with critical evaluation and collaboration with other teachers. Johnson devised a so-called triangular model for mentoring expertise, which requires every mentor to possess such qualities as: “mentor character virtues (integrity, caring, prudence); mentor abilities (cognitive, emotional, relational); and mentor competencies (knowledge and skills)” (as cited in Graves, 2010, p. 15). The study by Maynard (2000) reveals the most common traits which mentees would seek in their mentors, such as: “feeling welcome, accepted and included”, being supported, and having enough freedom while choosing the teaching approaches in the classroom. Ambrosetti (2014) also highlights some of the responsibilities that mentoring may include, such as “role modelling, supporting, challenging, facilitating, evaluating” (pp. 36-37). Feiman-Nemser (2001) also constantly uses the term “support teacher” when referring to a mentor, thereby outlining the central pertaining characteristic of mentors (p. 20). As Richter, Kunter, Lüdtke, Klusmann, Anders and Baumert (2013) elaborate further, mentoring support can be bifurcated in two types: instructional support and psychological support (p. 167). Instructional…show more content…
284). As regarding the pragmatic approach, such mentors tend to clearly indicate their authority in the mentoring relationship, via “imparting knowledge and skills to the learner” and providing precise and clear instructions to the mentee (Kwan & Lopez‐Real, 2005, p. 282). On the other hand, interpersonal mentor promotes the idea of mutual support, sharing and collaboration, which can facilitate professional growth both for the mentor and student teacher, for instance, as Kwan and Lopez‐Real (2005) clarify, a critical friend mentor is defined as a supporting friend, who nevertheless, can provide some constructive criticism for the sake of the mentee's professional improvement. Managerial style was regarded the least popular style among mentors, which can be explained by a highly judgemental and least flexible nature of the approach, comparing to pragmatic and interpersonal styles. Interestingly, but the change in perceptions of the mentoring roles was found in course of time and experience for some of the mentors and was influenced by two reasons: either because of the student’s
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