Media In Brave New World

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The role of mass media in democratic nations seem more than platitude. With media forms progressively diverging over time, the concern over the influence of media is growing. Whether it’s good or bad, different forms of media have different influences over the citizens’ view and participation in politics. Since the influence change the perceptions of people, who holds the sovereignty in democratic nation, it is often manipulated for different political agendas. “Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become trivial culture” (Postman, 4). Neil Postman, in Amusing Ourselves to Death, compared 1984 by George Orwell and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, claiming that the current society more closely resembles Huxley’s…show more content…
Often in the form of press, media do more than educate: it promotes citizenry participation in politics, triggering people’s interest and promoting political discussion. According to an observational study on Media use and participatory democracy in Korea, “reading the newspaper or watching television news showed a strong positive correlation with voting participation and political discussion” (Kim&Han, 143). Simply put, the media encouraged the people to its duty in democracy by providing the basic background knowledge on current political events. This role of media is especially important in Korea, for its citizens are restricted from any political activism during their teenage years. Thus the ignorance of political knowledge that originates from the lack of mandatory education on topics regarding politics is counteracted by the media, which encourage people to participate in political discourse. However “the effects of Newspaper Political News on the political discussion dropped considerably with the introduced of a cognitive variable of opinionation” (Kim&Han, 145). This indirectly proves that the majority of the people in Korea are silent listeners that are easily moulded to a viewpoint due to their continuous exposure to strongly opinionated media that does not provide any space for individual thoughts. Being unbiased, to some degree, is crucial for any media forms to be able to…show more content…
Despite Korea being a democratic nation, media surveillance resembles the dystopian society of 1984 by George Orwell. Orwell predicted that the society will come under a great surveillance, and that there will be no freedom granted for any individual.Though the society in 1984 operates like a communist nation, the limited freedom is similar to the current Korea. Not to the extreme degrees as Orwell predicted, but Korea’s limited media access and publication freedom limits citizens from achieving knowledge and gaining opportunity to hold individual thoughts. Orwell would thus lament such society, and encourage the people to advocate for the change to gain one’s complete freedom of speech. On the other hand, the concealment of the issues regarding politics more closely resembles the dystopia illustrated by Huxley. Due to superfluous information, especially regarding the popular culture, citizens are clearly distracted from information that should gain the most public attention. Both societies are dystopias. In Korea where there seems to be a coexistence of captive and trivial culture, one must realize the importance of individual sovereignty and perform its duty as a citizen of a democratic
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