Martin Luther's Accomplishments

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Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Germany. To Hans and Margarette Luther, Hans Luther wanted his promising son to have a better life and become a lawyer. At age seven, Martin Luther entered school in Mansfeld. At 14, he went to Magdeburg, where he continued his studies. In 1498, he returned to Eisleben and entered in a school, studying grammar, rhetoric and logic. He later compared this experience to purgatory and hell. Through his studies of scripture, Martin Luther finally gained “religious enlightenment”. Beginning in 1513, while preparing lectures, Luther read Psalm 22, which recounts Christ’s cry for mercy on the cross, a cry similar to his own confusion with God and religion. Two years later, while preparing…show more content…
The Church eventually moved to stop the act of defiance. In October 1518, at a meeting with Cardinal Thomas Cajetan in Augsburg, Martin Luther was ordered to recant his Ninety-Five Theses by the authority of the pope. Luther said he would not recant unless scripture proved him wrong. He went further; stating that he didn’t consider the papacy had the authority to interpret scripture. The meeting ended in a shouting match and initiated his ultimate excommunication from the Church. Throughout 1519, Martin Luther continued to lecture and write in Wittenberg. In June and July of that year he publicly declared that the Bible did not give the pope the exclusive right to interpret scripture, which was a direct attack on the authority of the papacy. Finally, in 1520, the pope had had enough and on June 15 issued an ultimatum threatening Luther with excommunication. On December 10, 1520, Luther publicly burned the letter. * Taught that the Bible was the only source of divinely revealed…show more content…
He was the second son of Gérard Cauvin, who was secretary to the bishop of Noyon. It was decided early in his life that Calvin would serve the Catholic Church, and at the age of twelve he became a chaplain at the Cathedral of Noyon. In August 1523 he went to Paris, France, and entered the College de la Marche at the University of Paris, where he soon became skilled in Latin. He then attended the College de Montaigu until 1528. Then he moved to Orleans, France, to study law. In 1531 Calvin returned to Paris with his law degree. At this time Protestant opposition to the church was growing. The ideas of Martin Luther concerning the saving of one's soul by faith alone were becoming popular in the city, and Calvin became involved in the movement for church reform. In January 1534 he fled Paris during a crackdown on Protestants and went to Angouleme, France, where he began writing down a full description of his beliefs. After several trips back to Paris he finally settled in Basel, Switzerland. Calvin's
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