Martin Luther King's Diary

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Dear Diary, Today, August 28, 1963, I witnessed a moment in time that will go down in history. The Civil-Rights leader that has made his name known by calling for civil and social change between the different races of Americans, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., stood in front of 250,000 people and gave a speech that will forever resonate through the minds and hearts of those who heard it. To understand why this moment, this speech, and this man is of great importance you must understand the civil unrest, the inequality between the white and blacks, the hardships faced by many due to the bigoted social norms that has been engrained in this country for so long. From the time that Africans were brought to this country to be the slaves of the…show more content…
“Despite the avowed non-violence policy of Dr. King” and the other Civil rights leader, many of us feared the event could turn violent and ugly (Bell, 2013). However, the event proved to be profound and exhilarating. The gathering of marchers drew significant numbers of not only colored folk, but white as well. There were many speakers who participated in the event, however, it was Dr. Kings speech that touched us all the most. He began his speech with ‘I have a dream’, and then described a life of peace between the whites and the colors. He passionately “called for an end to racism and the emergence of an America where individuals were judged not ‘by the colour of their skin, but by the content of their character’” (Bell, 2013). Of all the speakers today “Dr. King was the most eloquent voice and had the largest vision, a vision that we all can share and strive…show more content…
(2013, August). Witnessing Dr King’s ‘I have a dream’ speech. The Royal Gazette. Retrieved from http://www.royalgazette.com/article/20130828/NEWS/130829706 Edwards, O. (2010, February). Courage at the Greensboro Lunch Counter. Smithsonian. Retrieved from http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/courage-at-the-greensboro-lunch-counter-4507661/?no-ist Gross, T. (2006, January). Get On the Bus: The Freedom Riders of 1961. NPR Books. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/2006/01/12/5149667/get-on-the-bus-the-freedom-riders-of-1961 The Digital Library of Georgia. (2013). Civil Rights Digital Library. Retrieved from
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