Macbeth- "look like the innocent flower, yet be the serpent under it."

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In Act I Scene v, Lady Macbeth tells her husband, Macbeth, to "look like the innocent flower, yet be the serpent under it." This means to put on a poker face, which interprets into seeming innocent on the outside but really being deceitful on the inside. Sadly, in today's world, these devious people are found everywhere, from your local school to a co-worker or even a next door neighbor. One example of an untrustworthy person is Bernard L. Madoff, a NASDAQ chairman in New York City’s Wall Street. Throughout acts I and II, Macbeth and his wife were successful in being the "innocent flower" and "serpent under". Macbeth first seemed like this when he found out that the heir to the throne of Scotland was Malcolm and eventually again when Duncan announced he was going to stay a night in Macbeth's castle. From that point on, seeming like the flower but being the serpent came naturally to Macbeth. Upon his decision of killing Duncan, his wife Lady Macbeth, told him to not make anyone suspicious of their plans, which they succeeded in doing. During Act II, both Macbeth and his wife put on their "poker faces" and acted clueless upon discovering Duncan’s death. Bernard Madoff, a former NASDAQ chairman, is very much like Macbeth. Madoff was known as pleasant and charismatic. Yet he was famous for being eccentric, enforcing odd office rules such as keeping family photos in simple black frames only (Gandel). Being a quiet, reclusive man, he was barely seen in cocktail circuits. But he was a devout donor to the Democratic Party and Jewish organizations. The former NASDAQ chairman pulled off this con for years. In reality, Madoff was a power-hungry, “greedy manipulator so hungry to accumulate wealth that he did not care whom he hurt to get what he wanted” (Creswell). Unknown to his colleagues and competitors, Madoff ran a money management business on the side for decades.
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