Lord of the Flies Analysis

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"Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart, and the fall through the air of the true, wise friend called Piggy." How might this passage be used to demonstrate the main themes of Golding's Lord of the Flies? The novel, Lord of the Flies was written by William Golding in 1954. This novel is about a group of English schoolboys, who has a plane crash and assembles on an island, waiting for rescue. At the beginning, they try to set up a small society similar to the adult's and elect Ralph as a leader. Each elder boy has his own post and responsibility. Everything seems fine at first until the emergence of the beast - the fear grows up in the children's minds and changes everything. The hunters, with Jack as the chief become savage, kill Simon and Piggy, and finally try to kill Ralph. The beautiful island becomes a hell at the end of the novel. Finally, when Ralph is escaping from the hunting of other boys, he is saved by a navy officer who takes all boys back to the ship. Towards the end of the last chapter, the passage "Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man' heart, and the fall through the air of his true, wise friend called Piggy" demonstrates the main theme of this novel: man is evil by nature. The three things that Ralph weeps for are the lessons he has on this island: innocent boys become savage; all human beings have evil deep inside their hearts and the fall of science and rationality before the evil of human. These three issues are developed throughout the whole novel with this passage as the conclusion of the main theme - human beings are evil by nature. On a beautiful island like paradise, with deep blue sea and tall trees, it is difficult for us to imagine how the innocent English schoolboys will turn into the primitive barbarians. This change does not occur in a sudden, but develops bit by bit throughout the
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