Bonfire Of The Princesses Analysis

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5/25/2011 Enc1102 “ Bonfire of the Princesses Analysis” Barbara Ehrenreich is the author of the article “Bonfire of the Princesses.” In her article, the author points out how Disney has been over marketing their princesses to girls, and how Disney’s princesses are bad role models for children. She points out that everything on Disney’s product line is there to draw your child in to the princesses. While stating these points in her article she is trying to convince readers that Disney and its marketing is bad. Ehrenreich is effective with her appeal by getting the readers emotion and making them want to side against Disney; and also by getting the reader to think about if Disney should have as much credibility as it does with people. The…show more content…
She challenges Disney’s credibility as a business, and that it isn’t a good positive influence on children. According to the author the Princesses are “a sorry bunch of wusses” and they are not the type of role models children should be looking up to. The author explains how Disney’s reliability is bad, she writes, “Princesses exert their pull through a dark and undeniable eroticism. They’re sexy little wenches, for one thing. Snow White has gotten Slimmer and bustier over the years; Ariel wears nothing but a bikini top (though admittedly she’s half fish)” (Ehrenreich, 6). This makes readers feel like the princesses are inappropriate and may take away more of Disney’s credibility to them. Ehrenreich then accuses Disney of bringing sex into “pre-K playrooms” with the Princesses and says that it is not right or appropriate. All of this may make the reader begin to think Disney is not as credible or reliable as it…show more content…
She states that Disney makes 4 billion dollars annually off marketing their Princess products. This is the only statistic she gives, and she doesn’t use any sources to back up her data so it may not be very effective to the reader. Ehrenreich did not make a very strong counter argument. One thing she does point out is Mulan, one of the princesses, “dress as a boy to fight in the army” (Ehrenreich, 3). That is the only counter argument that she makes for Disney. Despite the lack of her counter argument it does not affect the article and it is still effective. This might be because most readers already have an idea of what Disney is like and do not need a counter argument to defend it. The author still probably should have used more of a counter argument though, so it would seem fairer. “Bonfire of the Princess” is written effectively by Ehrenreich with her use of ethos and pathos. She makes a good appeal to reader’s emotions by telling the story about her three year old daughter, and by comparing the Princesses to Dora the Explorer. She also effectively questions the credibility and reliability of Disney by making them look like a company with bad and even suggestive role models; as well as a whole product line made to make children like the Disney Princesses. She makes the reader feel uneasy about Disney and its products, while making them feel more comfortable with her. Ehrenreich makes an effective
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