Linda Hogan Analysis

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Table of Contents 1. Introduction: A Search for an Ecology of Mind 2 1.1. Linda Hogan: An Artist and an Environmentalist 7 1.2. The Consequences of American Indian Stereotyping 13 1.3. Central Themes in American Indian Fiction 19 1.4. Healing the Modern Split with Nature 23 2. The Real Events: The Osage Oil Rush, James Bay Hydroelectric Project, and the Endangered Panther 27 2.1. Pan-Indian versus Tribal-Specific Perspective 27 2.2. Mean Spirit: The Osage Reign of Terror 31 2.3. Solar Storms: Hydro-Quebec at James Bay 40 2.4. Power: A Seminole Chief Kills an Endangered Panther 45 3. Christian versus Earth-Based Religious Beliefs 50 3.1. Mean Spirit: Beyond Saint Franciscan Tradition Toward Earth-Based Religion 56…show more content…
Putting Hogan’s background, cultural identity and her personal and political beliefs into the context of her writing, I will discuss Hogan’s contribution to the contemporary discourse about the issues of the environmental degradation, environmental justice and American Indian communities. I will use Hogan’s fiction and non-fiction works to indicate the author’s position and an active participation in this discourse. In her novels – Mean Spirit (1990), Solar Storms (1995) and Power (1998) – Hogan points out the impact of the environmental degradation and suggests the way toward healing. All of these novels have strong political undertones because, though fictional accounts, they are all based on real events and they all deal with the issues of environmental degradation, environmental justice and cultural disintegration of American Indian societies. Hogan’s non-fiction books, Dwellings: A Spiritual History of the Living World (1995) and her memoir, The Woman Who Watches over the World (2001), along with numerous interviews with the author, helped me to explore her background and identify Hogan’s personal philosophy concerning environmental issues in general as well those affecting American Indian…show more content…
According to Cronon, wilderness is a human creation and therefore the wilderness ethics is not relevant to western problematic relationship with the nonhuman world since it favors only dramatic and sublime landscapes that are untouched by human presence. It does not consider the human interaction with the land and completely disregards the native inhabitants of the supposedly pristine environments: “The removal of Indians to create ‘uninhabited wilderness’ – uninhabited as never before in the human history of the place – reminds us just how constructed, the American wilderness really is” (Cronon 95). The idea of wilderness as it is defined in terms of Euro-American tradition and as such, it reproduces the nature – culture
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