Life In The South During Segregation/Integration

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Life in the South During Segregation/Integration My black American grandmother was born on June 6th, 1942. In the 1940’s a public opinion survey in the United States was conducted and the results showed that majority of white Americans thought blacks were okay with their social and economic conditions. Obviously they were way off, and wrong. Even though the 13th amendment brought an end to slavery in the US, in 1865, black Americans had to constantly learn, over and over, year after year that the word “freedom” depended on many different things. For example, the nations economy, the mood of the nation, pressures from other countries, goals of those in political power, and the strength of the black masses and their leaders to influence everything…show more content…
Did someone tell you?” “No, no one had to tell me you could see it, it was everywhere. At the movies, the bathrooms, you could even use the same bathroom as them white folk. There were signs I remember, sign said ‘for colored’ and ‘for white’s.” She pauses. “Mhm, yes you could tell no one had to tell you a thing” “What were your feelings toward Martin Luther King Jr. & Malcolm X?” “They were leaders, you know. We looked up to them because they were for rights, and they wanted people to live together… like they wanted equality you know? They wanted everyone to be… In other words the white folks shouldn’t have no more than the black people. That’s how they looked at it. We felt the same way. Why is it that the white should get more privilege than the black? So that’s why they fought and they marched and did all this so we can have equality. So we respect them very highly because they wanted the best. “What was your reaction when Dr. Martin Luther King died?” (You could tell that this question hit home for her) “Oh my god, we cried. Oh my god the whole world was mourning. I mean we were hurt because we didn’t have no more leader to help us. So now Al Sharpton is doing his best. It was…show more content…
It’s not even like her opinions about things have changed due to circumstances. The things she has said are true. Especially about the cops and racism today. Racism I feel will always be here. There will always be people who feel a way about African Americans, or any race for that matter. It hurts. I am a person who is very loving and feels like everyone should just learn to not hot and not discriminate but sometimes that’s just life and you have to deal with it. It’s amazing how much white influence has impacted my grand mothers life down to her name! I couldn’t believe her mom named her Jane just because that was hat her plantation owner told her to do. What’s mind blowing to me about all of this is that this wasn’t long ago at all. This was all but 65 years ago. Not far back at all. It is amazing to see how much times have changed and it has made me grateful that all the people who fought for equality. Although the fight isn’t over we’ve made such
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