Klugar And Amara Analysis

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History has shown us repetitive patterns; along with repetitive themes, ideas, and most of all, attitudes. This is thoroughly demonstrated through Ruth Klugars past experiences, and Amara’s similar knowledge of more current battles with religion, gender struggles, social class discriminations and/or advantages, ideas of belonging or lack there of , and the relationship these women have had to the people in power. Although these women experienced two completely separate historical hardships that shaped the core of their personality and views of the world, they share almost identical experiences in religious discrimination, adolescent confusions of identity, struggles with personal loss, cold shoulders and lack of faith in authority, and battles…show more content…
But seeing a world of hate, and discrimination through the eyes of Klugar and Amara, it is almost impossible to separate the two. Amara’s link of religion to social class is shown through her recollection of her peers view of her based on theses factors alone. “At school, along with the other children from the housing project, we were called the “kids from Herbet,” which was a way of identifying our neighborhood as the Arab quarter” pg.48. The way her schoolmates write her off as just being another herbet kid, shows the superior attitude that must have been prevalent around them. Kluger’s religion and ethnicity shaped the entire course of her life as well. As a young impressionable Jewish girl, her ideas of society and acceptable conduct were shaped in Vienna, while the Nazi regime was dominating daily life to the point where, “ A propaganda rag that featured lecherous Jews and their unspeakable sins, didn’t merely enjoy a large circulation, but full pages of it were on exhibit on the street corners” pg.51. Her religion determined her social class. Being Jewish classified her as inferior, and of the lowest social standing. It seems odd that such a complex idea, that could determine the fate of so many lives can be written in less than one line, but it is as simple as that, religion determined social class; and sadly enough, that statement is still accurate,…show more content…
Watching this deadly tornado form around her, and take those dear to her as it passed, can more than sufficiently explain her warped ideas of belonging. Something else is to be gained from a pure and innocent recollection. The raw truth is gained through an experience such as Kluger’s, not tainted by some historians personal beliefs, but the raw innocent truth, seen by a girl with limited prior knowledge, and no way to know the big picture beyond her restricted world. Unlike the historian who has a timeline of facts and events, she can express the tiny details that can be extremely significant when paired with current knowledge. Kluger’s account of sneaking into a showing of Snow White on a Sunday afternoon, may seem insignificant, but the simple reaction of her fellow movie goers, gives the reader great historical understanding. Her temporary German theatre neighbors, were not oblivious to the fact that there was a Jew in their showing, but Kluger’s peer, another young girl, felt she possessed such extreme social superiority, even obligation to be a patriot and contribute to rid the worlds snow white showings one Jewish girl at a time. “My enemy stood her ground and waited. She told her little brothers to hush and fixed me sternly. There I was, trapped. The baker’s daughter put on her gloves and coat, and
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