Kent State Massacre Analysis

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PLAN OF INVESTIGATION What happened during the Kent State Massacre of 1970; more specifically, what led to the attacks, and who was responsible? First, I will identify the social tensions of the time that may have led to the attack; paying close attention to the Nixon administration’s war plans. Secondly, I will explore the events that unfolded the day of the attacks. After identifying the tensions that led to the attack, and then investigating the attack itself, I will have come to a conclusion regarding what really happened at the Kent State Massacre and who was responsible. I believe this systematic approach will provide enough context to clearly decipher the events that unfolded that day in 1970. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE During…show more content…
Gordon’s The Forth of May. The main strength of this book was its ability to encompass all the various aspects of the attack. Instead of chronologically telling the story, this text told a quick summary of the events, then went on to dive deeper into the various aspects of the massacre in their own separate sections. The book, though written by one man, had numerous contributions from others. A main addition to the scope of the text was a constitutional scholar from Washington by the name of David Engdahl. The text also contains information from transcripts between victims and government agencies that were supplied by the acting liaison John P. Adams. The only negative aspect of this text was the lack of context regarding the incorporated photos. The pictures were helpful but I feel the author could have explained them better. Overall this text contained a very detailed account of the happenings during the first four days of May in 1970. It contained a plethora of relevant information that was backed by credible…show more content…
Innocent blood was spilled because of a few trigger happy Guardsmen. It is clear who acted out of line throughout this incident, but the question now at hand is why. The students – all but a few –were walking to their next class when the Guards stopped their retreat, turned around, and opened fire. Many ideas abound as to the cause of this random decision to attack, but the legal defense of the guard was that they acted in ‘self defense’. The immediate ramifications were felt within the US education system. Mass protest took place and triggered the first country wide student strike. Five days after the shootings over 100,000 people marched on Washington D.C. Nixon’s reaction to the attacks was almost as offensive as the attacks themselves. He toured the nation giving short speeches hinting at where the blame should ‘really be placed’. He took the time to slip in subtle insinuations into his speeches which clearly put the blame on the students. After many failed attempts to meet with enraged students and faculty, the president was eventually taken to Camp David to ensure his
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