Juveniles Tried as Adults

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Juveniles Tried As Adults Dorothy Isaac CRJ 376- Court Systems and Processes April 17, 2014 Abstract When a child kills, does he instantly become an adult? Or does he maintain some trappings of childhood, despite the gravity of his actions? These are the questions plaguing the American legal system today, as the violent acts of juvenile offenders continue to make headlines. Trial as an adult is a situation when a juvenile offender is tried as if he/she were an adult. Where specific protections exist for juvenile offenders such as suppression of an offender's name or picture or a closed courtroom where the proceedings are not made public, these protections may be waived. Trial as an adult is a situation when a juvenile offender is tried as if he/she were an adult. Where specific protections exist for juvenile offenders such as suppression of an offender's name or picture or a closed courtroom where the proceedings are not made public, these protections may be waived. There are several differences between juvenile court and criminal court in the United States. One of the most significant differences is the intent of the two systems; the focus of the juvenile justice system is on rehabilitation and future reintegration, while the goal of the criminal justice system is punishment and deterrence of future crime. In juvenile court rulings, decisions often take psychosocial factors into account along with current offense severity and the youth’s offense history. In contrast, in criminal proceedings, the severity of the offense and criminal history weigh most heavily in sentencing outcome. Upon release, those who pass through the juvenile justice system receive parole-like surveillance along with reintegration programs, reflecting the belief that juvenile behavior can be changed. Those released from prison receive surveillance which serves to monitor and
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