Julius Caesar's Dictatorship

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By the time of Julius Caesar's dictatorship and subsequent assassination at the hands of the Senate, the Roman Republic was in a virtual free-fall of corruption and struggle for power. The Roman people were tired of the turmoil brought on by decades of war and needed a leader that could and would restore peace, order, and prosperity. Nonetheless, thirteen years of civil war followed Caesar's assassination and during this time Octavian, the grand-nephew and heir of Caesar, came into his sizable inheritance. He entered into a military-dictatorship (the Second Triumvirate) of Rome with supporters of his late great-uncle, was given a senate seat, and was elected consul and granted imperium, all before the age of twenty. Before he was 32 years…show more content…
So, to achieve his end goal (the good of the state and not his own benefit), he courted the Senate and the people by upholding the republican traditions of Rome (to appear that he was not aspiring to monarchy), all while gradually increasing his power. He accepted partial control of the provinces of Rome by the Senate after feigning disinterest in having any control of the provinces. Shrewdly, he was able to acquire provinces that stationed the majority of the legions of Rome, while the Senate's control over the other Roman provinces helped maintain the illusion of a dual republican rule. Octavian was then given the titles Augustus (meaning 'the exalted') and Princeps (chief or leader) by the…show more content…
Rather than the old Republican competition for political rank and status, Augustus reorganized the administration so that advancement would be granted in an orderly, step-by-step fashion. He created new magisterial positions and extended the terms served in office to create a sense of stability. Rome achieved great glory under Octavian/Augustus. He restored peace after 100 years of civil war and maintained an honest government and a sound currency system. He extended the highway system connecting Rome with its far-flung empire, and built many bridges, aqueducts and buildings adorned with beautiful works of art. Augustus benefited from governing in the public interest, whether it be in politics or in marriage and family, and he tried to lead by example, even holding his own family to the standards he put forth to the people. The peace and prosperity of Augustus's reign is today known as the Pax Roman, the Roman Peace. The symbiotic relationship between Augustus and the Senate managed to bring stability and faith to a weary state through a mixture of tradition and innovation. He didn't govern by force or coercion, but rather with the people and for the people, all while ruling as
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