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Julious Caesar Supistion Essay

  • Submitted by: mypetninja
  • on May 2, 2012
  • Category: English
  • Length: 702 words

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Below is an essay on "Julious Caesar Supistion" from Anti Essays, your source for research papers, essays, and term paper examples.

In Julius Caesar, we see a brief picture of Roman life during the time of the First Triumvirate. In this snap shot, we see many unfortunate things. Shakespeare gives us the idea that many people try to circumvent what the future holds, such as unfortunate things, by being superstitious. Superstition seems to play a role in the basic daily life of most Roman citizens. 

The setting of the first scene is based upon superstition, the Feast of Lupercal. This feast is in honour of the god Pan, the queen of fertility. During this time, infertile females are supposed to be able to procreate, and fertile ones are supposed to be able to bear more. It is also a supposed time of sexual glorification and happiness. Other scenes depict how throughout Rome, roaming the streets are mysterious sooth- Sayers, who are supposedly given the power to predict the future. Dictating what is to come through terse titbits, these people may also be looked upon as superstitious. In the opening scene, one sooth-Sayers, old in his years, warns Caesar to "Beware the Ides of March," an admonition of Caesar's impending death. Although sooth-Sayers are looked upon by many as insane out of touch lower class men, a good deal of them, obviously including the sooth- sayers Caesar encountered, are indeed right on the mark. Since they lack any formal office or shop, and they predict forthcomings without fee, one can see quite easily why citizens would distrust their predictions. 

      As the play develops we see a few of signs of Caesar's tragic end. Aside from the sooth-saver’s warning, we also see another sign during Caesar's visit with the Augers, the latter day "psychics". They find "No heart in the beast", which they interpret as advice to Caesar that he should remain at home. Caesar brushes it off and thinks of it as a rebuke from the gods, meaning that he is a coward if he does not go out, and so he dismisses the wise advice as hearsay. However, the next morning, his wife Calpurnia wakes up...

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