Japanese Attack On Pearl Harbor Analysis

1023 Words5 Pages
Montana Daniels AP US History Summer Reading Assignment (Essay 1) Mr. Sigmon July 8, 2014 Lie #3: FDR Knew in Advance About the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor In his book, Larry Schweikarts argues that FDR did not know in advance about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Despite what Roosevelt stated election year: “I have said this before, but I shall say it again and again: your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars.” Roosevelt had every intention of having the US become a part of the Second World War. It becomes evident that the attack on Pearl Harbor was known by Washington, and the information was deliberately hidden from our commanders in Hawaii in hope this “surprise” attack would propel America into World War 2.…show more content…
Richardson protested to Roosevelt’s decision about permanently basing the fleet in Hawaii instead of its normal place in the west coast. Richardson protested that- Pearl Harbor was vulnerable to attack, it could not be effetely rigged with nets and baffles to defend against torpedo planes, in Hawaii it would be hard to supply and train crews for his undermanned vessels, Pearl Harbor lacked adequate fuel supplies and dry docks, and keeping men far away from families would create moral problems- Richardson stated: “I came away with the impression that, despite his spoken words, the President was fully determined to put the US into the war if Great Britain could hold out until he was re-elected.” Richardson was relieved of his command and was replaced by Admiral Husband E Kimmel. Kimmel also told about Pearl Harbors problems but accepted the…show more content…
The evidence shows that President Roosevelt wanted to make the US apart of the war and took any means necessary. He promised to keep American soldiers out of any foreign wars but also made promises to Britain that America would help them in the war. The secrecy of the attack caused America to lose over 2,000 servicemen, 188 planes to be destroyed, and eighteen naval vessels to be sunk or heavily damaged. The attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 was known by Washington and FDR, but was kept from the Hawaiian
Open Document