James Madison's Rise To Power

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James Madison lived his life on his knowledge from books and theories. Madison was born in a middle class family. Madison’s father was the richest in Virginia due to the land that Madison’s father owned. It was expected that James Madison was set for life after his father passes away. Due to his father’s wealth, James Madison was set for college, and a great education. Madison was given opportunities to high level schools because of his status. Madison was a very smart person and finished college in a three year span. Madison gained large interest in his studies and took advantage of it. He made sure that he was good with what he learned so he won’t become a farmer like his father and grandfather. He looked for hobbies and jobs to understand…show more content…
Books were Madison’s main source where he built his empire around with great thoughts and ideas for his future. While Madison’s stay in congress, Madison developed many skills about politics and how to seprate them from right and wrong. Madison’s thoughts, speeches, and papers were respected by many people due to great meaning. Madison knew what he was talking about. As a member of the Constitutional Convention, Madison was unlike the rest of the members, full of fire and eagerness to make changes centralized towards a strong central government. He stood tall near his judgments. While talking to the people, Madison was really confident with what he presented because of his studies. Some of Madison’s proposals were not implied. However, if his proposals were ignored he thought of better ones to be enforced. He came to a great proposal where he stated that "proposals that would best accommodate the constitution to his own notions of how government should operate." Page…show more content…
Madison was faced with huge problems. He had trouble with the cabinet because of rivals and critics. Madison had difficulties with Great Britain and France; Madison had problems trading with their allies. With these problems in tack, James Madison was forced to ignore his constitutional objections against the National Bank of the United States because Gallatin, the architect of Republican financial policy, "insisted that its lending services would be needed to limit the taxes Congress would otherwise have to levy to prepare for the nation's armed forces for war." Page 184 Not only does Madison go against his belief towards the constitution but also was forced into a war, which he never wanted to have any part of. Madison even stated that he "hoped that Britain would back down once it saw Congress acting to prepare for war."Page
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