It Is Through Welles' Sympathetic Representation of Character That the Audience Engages with Citizen Kane's Most Memorable Ideas.

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In his film, Citizen Kane, Welles uses characterisation to question society’s obsession with absolutes, and further challenge the deemed truth of societal perception. Representation of character is, indeed, sympathetic as the film draws focus upon characters’ motivations rather than simply their actions. Welles provides the audience with a range of different representations of Charles Foster Kane, allowing him to explore the character in remarkable depth. The characters of Bernstein and Leland are also represented sympathetically, but in a different way. Leland is depicted as a victim of Kane’s insincerity, his pure morality not being able to cope with the corrupt world. Additionally, Bernstein’s complicity with Kane’s corruption is sympathetically portrayed as loyalty, while the character’s view of Kane is easily the most forgiving and even loving. Firstly, Welles makes a clear point out of representing Kane’s character through solely subjective viewpoints, sympathetically suggesting to the audience that one must not be judged solely on his actions. The prodigious director espouses an early postmodernist perspective, questioning society’s absolute faith in facts. This idea has naturally led to the empowerment of media, as their voice is believed without question. The power of the media is first shown with the “News on the March” sequence. The segment provides the audience with the first information on Kane’s narrative, in the form of a complete list of facts about his life. However, heavy-handed (to the point of satirical) use of music, tone and language suggest that the news piece is, in fact, still simply presenting the audience with another subjective view of Charles Foster Kane. Interestingly, the only time Welles presents the audience with a view of Kane without apparent intermediation is in the opening scene, where Kane whispers “Rosebud”, perhaps

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